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Sunday, October 28, 2007

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), How Could We Help to Prevent It in Schools

The Centers for Disease Control, CDC, along with parents and school officials, wants to do everything possible to protect students from MRSA skin infections. These are commonly asked questions that will help parents and school officials prevent the spread of MRSA in schools.

But what struck me to be standing out is;

How do I protect myself from getting MRSA?

You can protect yourself by:

practicing good hygiene (e.g., keeping your hands clean by washing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and showering immediately after participating in exercise);

covering skin trauma such as abrasions or cuts with a clean dry bandage until healed;

avoiding sharing personal items (e.g., towels, razors) that come into contact with your bare skin; and using a barrier (e.g., clothing or a towel) between your skin and shared equipment such as weight-training benches;

maintaining a clean environment by establishing cleaning procedures for frequently touched surfaces and surfaces that come into direct contact with people's skin.



CDC has published more facts about MRSA and it never huts to learn;

What type of infection does MRSA cause?

How is MRSA transmitted?

In what settings do MRSA skin infections occur?

How do I protect myself from MRSA?

Should schools close because of a MRSA infection?

Should the school be closed to be cleaned or disinfected when an MRSA infection occurs?

Should the entire school community be notified of every MRSA infection?

Should the school be notified that my child has an MRSA infection?

Should students with MRSA skin infections be excluded from attending school?

I have an MRSA skin infection. How do I prevent spreading it to others?


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